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prokopetz:

kurtwagnernightcrawler:

civil-anarchy:

lordgrunty:

whitebeltwriter:

artemis-devotee:

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

""but that book character has blue/grey/light eyes so obviously they’re white!!"" ://///

Yes, goddamnit

















(Reminder that light eyes and blonde hair can be caused by conditions, such as Waardenburg Syndrome and albinism, but they are still real people that can (and should) be represented in media and such)

And also I can add that I have news for y’all, people can be black and naturally blonde







And literally people from ANY KIND can be a redheadand have freackles and such


















So please, stop pretending only white people can have those characteristics, jfc, it’s sofucking annoying.

boom-de-yada

Boom de yada

Just to add on - While race is a very, very, very significant issue, race as we know it is a social construct. When you acknowledge that all people on earth have veeeery little genetic variation in the scope of things, it’s much easier to break oneself from the training of “only white people have this, only black people have that, only asian people have this trait, etc”

the funny thing ist though, even if a character is described as having dark skin, dark hair and brown eyes, theyre still being cast as white

It’s also worth noting that the fact that a black person has blonde or red hair doesn’t necessarily mean they’ve got a white ancestor kicking around in their family tree. Recent genetic studies suggest that the gene that codes for blonde hair in black African populations is completely different from the gene that codes for blonde hair in white European populations, and that blond hair among Aboriginal Australian populations is connected to yet a third gene. The same trait has independently arisen at least three times in humanity’s generic history, and only one of those cases is linked with light skin per se.

(Interestingly, this also means that the widspread belief that blonde hair is part of a complex of adaptations to low-sunlight regions is probably false, since populations that live in the sunniest parts of the world have their own blonde-hair mutations unrelated to the European one.)

(Source: nya-kin)

mindblowingscience:

fluffmugger:

ryttu3k:

shirilee:

keeperofthehens:

love-lust-rockyhorror:

listoflifehacks:


If you like this list of life hacks, follow ListOfLifeHacks for more like it!

I love how this post is like “Oh, clean up some of the nastiest, hard to clean shit with coke!” but doesn’t mention “Hey, you actually ingest this stuff that can clean CORRODED CAR BATTERIES.”

Uhg.

Heyyy this is because when you put carbon dioxide to make the carbonated water, you get carbonic acid. Carbonic acid varies in how much the pH is, especially in the different coke products. Strong enough to dissolve rust but not steel or any of the metals mentioned here.

But here’s the thing, carbonic acid is not one of the 6 strong acids. You know what is one of those? Hydrocholric acid. You know where you naturally secrete hydrocholric acid? Your stomach. Hydrochloric acid is some nasty stuff and WILL eat away at a screw if allowed to soak long enough. If you ever got just drop of a diluted solution on your skin in chem lab, then you can see where that would happen very easily.

The stronger acid wins. Your tummy is fine when you drink coke. Your tummy makes acid strong enough to fuck that corroded battery up. It can handle a can of coke. Please don’t swallow a screw or something to test this tho, please.

thank you science side of tumblr <3

Seriously. You could probably do all of these with lemon juice (citric acid) or vinegar (ethanoic, or acetic, acid) just because acids work in pretty similar ways. Actually, when you see people recommending vinegar as a household cleaner? This is what it’s doing!

Also, as someone who has accidentally inhaled hydrochloric acid fumes, TRUST ME, THE CARBONIC ACID IS MUCH BETTER.

Every time I see a hysterical post on modern food I just kinda point and laugh

Because dude. Dude.  You know what you breathe in and out every fucking second to survive? Oxygen. An incredibly corrosive gas that is probably responsible for more deaths across the history of the planet than anything else. Not only that, it’s a biproduct of photosynthesis. You literally rely on plant excretions to survive

Do you know what most of your body is made up of? Water. Which, given enough time, will destroy anything.

That morning coffee you like? Well shit, caffeine - lifeblood to many - is actually an incredibly potent nerve toxin (If you’re an insect). Plants actually produce that shit as an insecticide.

That refreshing zing from citrus?  Acid.  That juicy smack of a tomato? Acid and cadmium.  That tart in an apple? Arsenic.  That seasoning you put all over your fish and chips? Acid strong enough to destroy seashells - life that has evolved to survive living in a salt-drenched sea.

Stop being a tit and drink your damned coke.

EVERYTHING. IS. CHEMICALS.

themcscumblr:

mindblowingscience:

pickledpennies:

m00nchaser:

If bees become extinct we will have exactly 4 YEARS to live on this planet. I don’t understand how “not giving a fuck” is more important than your life…

okay, I have a thing to say about this. I’m no expert on bees, but I am a biologist (and entomologist) so I think there is something I can contribute that’ll be of worth.

I agree entirely with the sentiment that we must protect honeybees. Obviously they are massively important for biodiversity, as well as pollinating food crops for humans. There is no doubt that if all the honeybees in the world were to vanish in a day that the consequences would be dire.

However, I disagree that the main cause for concern regarding honeybee death is the use of Genetically Modified (GM) crops. I’d be very interested to read a research paper that says ‘GM crops have killed millions of honeybees’, if indeed such a paper exists because in all honesty I find it highly unlikely that this is a true statement.

Let’s start with some facts about GM crops:

1. The development of GM crops is a highly regulated process, bound by strict country-specific legislature. A great number of trials are carried out long before commercial planting of a GM crop is even considered. It is these trials, and accompanying laboratory studies, that ensure a GM crop is safe to non-target organisms (such as honeybees) by investigating direct and indirect effects (Nap et al. 2003).

2. Crops that are genetically modified to express insecticidal proteins (for crop pest control) have a high level of specificity. This means that the insecticidal proteins being produced by the GM plant will only affect a narrow range of insect groups because of the chemical properties of the protein. For example, GM crops expressing insecticidal proteins sourced from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) will only target some Lepidopteran pests (caterpillars; Romeis et al. 2006). Furthermore, a recent meta-analysis of the literature found that GM Bt crops do not negatively affect the survival of adult honeybees or their larvae (Duan et al. 2008).

3. GM crops can be tailored such that the novel gene is expressed only in particular parts of the plant. For example, GM Bt rice plants express the toxin in the stems but not the grains (Datta et al. 1998). This technique means that gene expression can be excluded from the flowers/pollen of the crop plant, so that bees and other pollinators would not be affected. Neat, huh?

So those are a token few reasons why GM crops are safer than perhaps many people believe (as the result of a lot of questionable, non-scientific articles). To come back to our main point about honeybee death, I would like to briefly mention a few alternative explanations for the recent decline in honeybee populations. These are as follows:

1. Many bees have died as the result of broad-spectrum insecticide use. These are pesticides that lack specificity, and can be harmful to non-target organisms. Neonicotinoids are a well-studied example of this (Decourtye & Devillers, 2010). Not to worry, though, because many broad-spectrum pesticides including neonics are well on their way out. Indeed, the EU recently banned a large cohort of neonic pesticides. This is still a topic of controversy, mind (Goulson, 2013).

2. Many bees have died as the result of Varroa mite infestation. Imagine you’ve been bitten by several ticks, except those ticks are the size of dinner plates. That gives you an idea of the severity of a Varroa mite infestation on a single developing bee. The parasitisation of bees by Varroa mites and other parasites is often accompanied by disease transmission. This can result in colonies dying within two years after infestation (Johnson, 2011).

3. Many bees have died as the result of ‘colony collapse disorder’.  This is a phrase that has popped up a lot recently, and is basically an umbrella term for the various causes of bee death including parasite infestation, disease transmission, environmental stresses, and management stresses such as poor nutrition (Johnson, 2011). Colony collapse has been attributed to broad-spectrum pesticide use in some instances. However, it is has still been observed in countries where broad-spectrum pesticides have been withdrawn (in the EU, like I mentioned earlier; Johnson, 2011).

So those are my main points. Please excuse the bullet-point nature of this; I was trying to keep it fairly short. Not sure I managed that haha. But anyway, my take-home message is that GM crops are not the enemy when it comes to honeybee decline. If anything, bees are at much greater danger from the use of broad-spectrum pesticides and from parasites and diseases. Using GM can even help to alleviate some of the problems associated with broad-spectrum pesticides, as they greatly reduce the need to apply such chemicals (Romeis et al. 2006).

A finishing note: Do your homework. Go on google scholar and read some of the literature, making sure it is recent (within the past 10-15 years). Literature reviews are a great way to find out what the consensus is on any given topic. Don’t use popular media as your main source of information where science is concerned; they tend to favour scandal and exaggeration. You want to know what’s really going on? Check out some research articles and see for yourself.

Thanks for sticking it through to the end of this impromptu mini-essay! —Alice

References:

Datta, K., Vasquez, A., Tu, J., Torrizo, L., Alam, M. F., Oliva, N., Abrigo, E., Khush, G. S., & Datta, S. K. (1998). Constitutive and tissue-specific differential expression of the cryIA (b) gene in transgenic rice plants conferring resistance to rice insect pest. Theoretical and Applied Genetics, 97(1-2), 20-30.

Decourtye, A., & Devillers, J. (2010). Ecotoxicity of neonicotinoid insecticides to bees. In Insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (pp. 85-95). Springer New York.

Duan, J. J., Marvier, M., Huesing, J., Dively, G., & Huang, Z. Y. (2008). A meta-analysis of effects of Bt crops on honey bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae). PLoS One, 3(1), e1415.

Goulson, D. (2013). Neonicotinoids and bees: What’s all the buzz?. Significance, 10(3), 6-11.

Johnson, R. (2011). Honey bee colony collapse disorder. DIANE Publishing.

Nap, J. P., Metz, P. L., Escaler, M., & Conner, A. J. (2003). The release of genetically modified crops into the environment. The Plant Journal, 33(1), 1-18.

Romeis, J., Meissle, M., & Bigler, F. (2006). Transgenic crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis toxins and biological control. Nature biotechnology, 24(1), 63-71.

This commentary is SO important. Succinct and with proper sourcing; beautiful.

It infuriates me when people blame GMO for everything without actually examining the evidence.

The way scientific replies on tumblr should be handled: Sourced and informed.

(Source: antinwo)

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.
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allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

trcunning:

wordplaying:

firesnaps:

MD Lab: Hello, yes, is this the CDC 

CDC: Uh, yes. 

MD Lab: Listen, I don’t want to alarm you, but we found some small pox this morning. 

CDC: Wait— wait what? You found smallpox. Like a person infected with smallpox? How and what. 

MD Lab: No, no, no. Not a person. Just a vial of it. Well, Carl found it. Erm, a few vials. Multiple vials of smallpox are in play here. 

CDC: I’m trying to get past the “found” smallpox here. How do you “find” an eradicated disease 

MD Lab: Yes, Carl found it. He was cleaning out an old storage room and he discovered a literal box of smallpox. We assume it’s been there for a while. Honestly, I didn’t even know that room existed until we found it while moving some cabinets the other wee— 

CDC: Is the threat contained? Did Carl follow your lab’s procedure on discovering potentially hazardous material? 

MD Lab: Erm. He sorta just…chucked it onto my desk. But it didn’t break! 

CDC: You’re telling me a lab worker threw a box of smallpox at you. 

Carl? What? No, he’s Bill in accounts’ son. He’s been cleaning here all summer

CDC: ….ffs. Who runs this lab 

MD Lab: …uhhhh, the FDA. 

RIGHT?!

And the real glory is that you’re right, I will bet you anything it was a gaggle of summer interns who were tasked to do the inventory and actually found the stuff; they hire a zillion of them every year. One of them is our sometimes-babysitter-slash-Spanish-tutor, the college kid who lives 2 doors down. 

So, you know. Feel confident and stuff. 

Holy shit!

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